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Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

First Romanian 3D bio-printer, produced in Timisoara

Experts from Symme 3D, a technology start-up in Timisoara, have made the first 3D bio-printer in Romania. The device is being used in advanced experiments carried out by OncoGen - Center for Gene and Cellular Therapies in the Treatment of Cancer, a unique institute in Romania and Southeastern Europe.

“We’re already working with the printer, I made the first samples of cartilage with the colleagues from OncoGen. In addition to stem cells that can be harvested only at birth, we also try to use epithelial cells, because these cells are most easily reprogrammed. At the stage we are now, we can use this printer to print large cartilaginous tissues, such as cartilage, ears, and noses, because they don’t have a complex vascularization,” said Romanian entrepreneur Calin Brandabur, founder and Chief Technology Officer of Symme 3D, cited by local Mediafax.

In the future, the center's experts plan to also print blood vessels, skin, big organs such as liver and kidneys, and even muscles and bones. According to Brandabur, who was part of the team that worked on the bio-printer, the risk that the body will reject these organs will be practically zero.

“Because we’re talking about cells from the same DNA, the same body, the same patient.”

The OncoGen institute in Timisoara bought three 3D printers, including the one produced by Symme 3D, which is the most advanced. The center plans to file for EU funds to finance tests in the field of 3D regeneration.

Irina Popescu, [email protected]

(Photo source: Symme3D on Facebook)

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Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

First Romanian 3D bio-printer, produced in Timisoara

Experts from Symme 3D, a technology start-up in Timisoara, have made the first 3D bio-printer in Romania. The device is being used in advanced experiments carried out by OncoGen - Center for Gene and Cellular Therapies in the Treatment of Cancer, a unique institute in Romania and Southeastern Europe.

“We’re already working with the printer, I made the first samples of cartilage with the colleagues from OncoGen. In addition to stem cells that can be harvested only at birth, we also try to use epithelial cells, because these cells are most easily reprogrammed. At the stage we are now, we can use this printer to print large cartilaginous tissues, such as cartilage, ears, and noses, because they don’t have a complex vascularization,” said Romanian entrepreneur Calin Brandabur, founder and Chief Technology Officer of Symme 3D, cited by local Mediafax.

In the future, the center's experts plan to also print blood vessels, skin, big organs such as liver and kidneys, and even muscles and bones. According to Brandabur, who was part of the team that worked on the bio-printer, the risk that the body will reject these organs will be practically zero.

“Because we’re talking about cells from the same DNA, the same body, the same patient.”

The OncoGen institute in Timisoara bought three 3D printers, including the one produced by Symme 3D, which is the most advanced. The center plans to file for EU funds to finance tests in the field of 3D regeneration.

Irina Popescu, [email protected]

(Photo source: Symme3D on Facebook)

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