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Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at [email protected] 

 

RO Social Democrat opposition to come up with alternative budget planning

The leader of Romania's Social Democratic Party (PSD), Marcel Ciolacu, announced in a post on Facebook that his party would come up with its budget alternative.

PSD aims to prove that there is money "to preserve the Romanians' living standards."

Ciolacu's announcement came as the Constitutional Court ruled against the law that increases pensions by 40% on Wednesday, January 13.

However, when he made the statement, Ciolacu (and a large part of the media) was expecting the Constitutional Court to decide in favor of the Social Democrats and the 40% pension rise.

"They complain that they have no money, but they never seek solutions. Money exists! #PSD will present its #budget alternative to prove that there would be enough money for maintaining the Romanians' living standards, if only they (the ruling coalition - e.n.) did not siphon it," Ciolacu wrote, quoted by G4media.ro.

The Social Democrats can still use the opportunity to argue on a political note in favor of higher pensions to put the ruling coalition in a difficult situation.

But according to the Constitutional Court, it is the Parliament where the Government is backed by a majority, that should make the final decision about how much the pensions can increase.

(Photo: Octav Ganea/ Inquam Photos)

[email protected]

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Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at [email protected] 

 

RO Social Democrat opposition to come up with alternative budget planning

The leader of Romania's Social Democratic Party (PSD), Marcel Ciolacu, announced in a post on Facebook that his party would come up with its budget alternative.

PSD aims to prove that there is money "to preserve the Romanians' living standards."

Ciolacu's announcement came as the Constitutional Court ruled against the law that increases pensions by 40% on Wednesday, January 13.

However, when he made the statement, Ciolacu (and a large part of the media) was expecting the Constitutional Court to decide in favor of the Social Democrats and the 40% pension rise.

"They complain that they have no money, but they never seek solutions. Money exists! #PSD will present its #budget alternative to prove that there would be enough money for maintaining the Romanians' living standards, if only they (the ruling coalition - e.n.) did not siphon it," Ciolacu wrote, quoted by G4media.ro.

The Social Democrats can still use the opportunity to argue on a political note in favor of higher pensions to put the ruling coalition in a difficult situation.

But according to the Constitutional Court, it is the Parliament where the Government is backed by a majority, that should make the final decision about how much the pensions can increase.

(Photo: Octav Ganea/ Inquam Photos)

[email protected]

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