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Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

No agreement on "special pensions" among members of RO ruling coalition

There is no consensus in the Romanian ruling coalition regarding the categories of special pensions that should be eliminated, the minister of European Projects, Cristian Ghinea, admitted, Profit.ro reported.

"All special pensions must be on the table," he stressed the position of his reformist USR PLUS party.

"That's what is written there in the Resilience Plan, that we will bring special pensions in line with contributions," Ghinea told Digi 24.

The topic of the so-called "special pensions", namely the pensions paid from the state budget (as opposed to social security budget) and not backed by recipients' contributions, has been high on Romania's political agenda and in the electoral/ruling strategies of the parties that now form the ruling coalition.

Several legislative attempts to tackle the issue, ironically backed by Social Democrats, failed amid a lack of constitutional clarity.

Never publicly admitted, each of the parties officially supporting the fight against "special pensions" has a private agenda with exceptions.

Asked if only the magistrates' [special] pensions are intangible, in line with the Constitutional Court's decision on this topic, Ghinea stated: "In my opinion, yes, but there is no consensus in the coalition on this subject".

(Photo: George Calin/ Inquam Photos)

andrei@romania-insider.com

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Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

No agreement on "special pensions" among members of RO ruling coalition

There is no consensus in the Romanian ruling coalition regarding the categories of special pensions that should be eliminated, the minister of European Projects, Cristian Ghinea, admitted, Profit.ro reported.

"All special pensions must be on the table," he stressed the position of his reformist USR PLUS party.

"That's what is written there in the Resilience Plan, that we will bring special pensions in line with contributions," Ghinea told Digi 24.

The topic of the so-called "special pensions", namely the pensions paid from the state budget (as opposed to social security budget) and not backed by recipients' contributions, has been high on Romania's political agenda and in the electoral/ruling strategies of the parties that now form the ruling coalition.

Several legislative attempts to tackle the issue, ironically backed by Social Democrats, failed amid a lack of constitutional clarity.

Never publicly admitted, each of the parties officially supporting the fight against "special pensions" has a private agenda with exceptions.

Asked if only the magistrates' [special] pensions are intangible, in line with the Constitutional Court's decision on this topic, Ghinea stated: "In my opinion, yes, but there is no consensus in the coalition on this subject".

(Photo: George Calin/ Inquam Photos)

andrei@romania-insider.com

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