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Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania joins the group of EU nuclear power advocates

With a share of nearly 20% of the nuclear energy in its total electricity mix and planning to double this share by building more nuke reactors, Romania joined the Czech Republic, France, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Hungary, the EU countries that advocate in favor of nuclear reactors as a sustainable source of energy, according to Digi24.

And indeed, experts in charge of the European Union's assessment of nuclear energy from an ecological point of view are to declare that it is sustainable, so investments in this field can be approved, according to a document consulted by Reuters, Hotnews.ro reported.

Experts in Brussels failed to reach a consensus on a "green label" for nuclear energy last year. They acknowledged that it produces very little carbon dioxide, which contributes to global warming, but said they needed to analyze further the impact of radioactive waste disposal on the environment.

Heads of state and government from seven European Union member states, including Romania, are defending the role of nuclear energy in Europe in a letter to the European Commission made public on March 25.

Some countries favor including nuclear energy in this mix due to its climate benefits, as it produces very low CO2 emissions. Other countries, such as Germany and Austria, oppose this perspective.

andrei@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Joedeer/Dreamstime.com)

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Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania joins the group of EU nuclear power advocates

With a share of nearly 20% of the nuclear energy in its total electricity mix and planning to double this share by building more nuke reactors, Romania joined the Czech Republic, France, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Hungary, the EU countries that advocate in favor of nuclear reactors as a sustainable source of energy, according to Digi24.

And indeed, experts in charge of the European Union's assessment of nuclear energy from an ecological point of view are to declare that it is sustainable, so investments in this field can be approved, according to a document consulted by Reuters, Hotnews.ro reported.

Experts in Brussels failed to reach a consensus on a "green label" for nuclear energy last year. They acknowledged that it produces very little carbon dioxide, which contributes to global warming, but said they needed to analyze further the impact of radioactive waste disposal on the environment.

Heads of state and government from seven European Union member states, including Romania, are defending the role of nuclear energy in Europe in a letter to the European Commission made public on March 25.

Some countries favor including nuclear energy in this mix due to its climate benefits, as it produces very low CO2 emissions. Other countries, such as Germany and Austria, oppose this perspective.

andrei@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Joedeer/Dreamstime.com)

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