Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at [email protected] 

 

E.ON reaches 100 charging points for e-vehicles in Romania

Utility company E.ON Energie Romania, part of German group E.ON, has installed about 100 public and private charging points for electric cars in Romania through the E.ON Drive project.

Most charging points are in Bucharest and in the Moldova region, where E.ON also runs electricity distribution operations.

The charging points can be found through the E.ON Drive online platform and mobile application.

The E.ON electromobility solution serves both individuals and business customers - mainly companies operating in HoReCa, real estate, and industry.

However, the data regarding the electricity delivered through the network shows that the market is developing slowly.

This year the number of charging sessions through the E.ON Drive application exceeded 2,200, approximately 33.3 MWh of electricity being used through E.ON's charging points.

This amount of energy would cover more than 180,000 km and simultaneously reduce CO2 emissions by about 25 tonnes, according to the calculations compiled by E.ON Energie Romania.

Another comparison shows that alternatively, a small car using 10 litres of petrol per 100 km would have consumed 18,000 litres of petrol.

(Photo: Pixabay)

[email protected]

Normal
Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at [email protected] 

 

E.ON reaches 100 charging points for e-vehicles in Romania

Utility company E.ON Energie Romania, part of German group E.ON, has installed about 100 public and private charging points for electric cars in Romania through the E.ON Drive project.

Most charging points are in Bucharest and in the Moldova region, where E.ON also runs electricity distribution operations.

The charging points can be found through the E.ON Drive online platform and mobile application.

The E.ON electromobility solution serves both individuals and business customers - mainly companies operating in HoReCa, real estate, and industry.

However, the data regarding the electricity delivered through the network shows that the market is developing slowly.

This year the number of charging sessions through the E.ON Drive application exceeded 2,200, approximately 33.3 MWh of electricity being used through E.ON's charging points.

This amount of energy would cover more than 180,000 km and simultaneously reduce CO2 emissions by about 25 tonnes, according to the calculations compiled by E.ON Energie Romania.

Another comparison shows that alternatively, a small car using 10 litres of petrol per 100 km would have consumed 18,000 litres of petrol.

(Photo: Pixabay)

[email protected]

Normal
 

Romania Insider Free Newsletters