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Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania to keep schools open, except for classes where Covid cases are spotted

The Romanian authorities decided to keep the schools open irrespective of the incidence of Covid-19 cases in a particular city - while only the classes where infected pupils are spotted will be closed.

Under the previous regulations, the schools were supposed to be closed with the education process continued online, for cities and villages with incidence rates of above 6 per thousand. This threshold was already exceeded in Bucharest and other several big cities.

Instead, massive testing will be carried among pupils with the aim of spotting the infection cases.

To this end, the ministry of education requested the medical licensing body to approve the use of non-invasive tests that would be much easily accepted by parents, Economica.net reported.

Most of the parents have been reluctant to give their consent for such tests in their absence - but since then the testing became a much more common procedure among people seeking to spend their holidays abroad.

Consequently, the massive testing policy is much more likely to be accepted, unlike the vaccination campaign that still meets robust skepticism.

(Photo: Octav Ganea/ Inquam Photos)

andrei@romania-insider.com

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Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania to keep schools open, except for classes where Covid cases are spotted

The Romanian authorities decided to keep the schools open irrespective of the incidence of Covid-19 cases in a particular city - while only the classes where infected pupils are spotted will be closed.

Under the previous regulations, the schools were supposed to be closed with the education process continued online, for cities and villages with incidence rates of above 6 per thousand. This threshold was already exceeded in Bucharest and other several big cities.

Instead, massive testing will be carried among pupils with the aim of spotting the infection cases.

To this end, the ministry of education requested the medical licensing body to approve the use of non-invasive tests that would be much easily accepted by parents, Economica.net reported.

Most of the parents have been reluctant to give their consent for such tests in their absence - but since then the testing became a much more common procedure among people seeking to spend their holidays abroad.

Consequently, the massive testing policy is much more likely to be accepted, unlike the vaccination campaign that still meets robust skepticism.

(Photo: Octav Ganea/ Inquam Photos)

andrei@romania-insider.com

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