Over 80% of Romanians can’t give first aid

The pandemic paused specialized first aid courses for almost two years, but more and more Romanians, especially the young and those who recently became parents, are now signing up.

The new applicants may not be enough. Recent studies show that over 80% of Romanians don’t know how to give first aid.

“I’m going to get my driver’s license. It seemed important to have this kind of training as well,” said Mihai, a student in one of the courses, cited by Euronews. “I became a father. I think you worry more when you’re responsible for someone other than yourself. You become much more cautious, let’s say,” he added.

Other students also note the importance of knowing what to do in a crisis situation. During first aid courses, they learn how to bandage a wound, and what to do when someone swallows dangerous substances, has an epileptic crisis, has an anaphylactic shock, or is bitten by an animal.

The Iași Emergency Medical Services gives first aid courses once a month. After two years off due to the pandemic, all spots are now taken. In 2019 and 2020, the volunteers who are part of the NGO taught roughly 4,760 people how to give first aid. This year, the figure is at 5,300 after only six months.

Marius Benchea, manager of the Iași Voluntary Emergency Medical Services, says there are many myths about first aid regarding burn victims, for example. “The vast majority of tragedies start from cardio-respiratory arrests, when people are not resuscitated in time,” he thinks.

First-aid courses are now organized in Iași, Suceava, Bacău and Neamț. They last around three hours and cost RON 200 (EUR 40).

radu@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Wellphotos | Dreamstime.com)

Normal

Over 80% of Romanians can’t give first aid

The pandemic paused specialized first aid courses for almost two years, but more and more Romanians, especially the young and those who recently became parents, are now signing up.

The new applicants may not be enough. Recent studies show that over 80% of Romanians don’t know how to give first aid.

“I’m going to get my driver’s license. It seemed important to have this kind of training as well,” said Mihai, a student in one of the courses, cited by Euronews. “I became a father. I think you worry more when you’re responsible for someone other than yourself. You become much more cautious, let’s say,” he added.

Other students also note the importance of knowing what to do in a crisis situation. During first aid courses, they learn how to bandage a wound, and what to do when someone swallows dangerous substances, has an epileptic crisis, has an anaphylactic shock, or is bitten by an animal.

The Iași Emergency Medical Services gives first aid courses once a month. After two years off due to the pandemic, all spots are now taken. In 2019 and 2020, the volunteers who are part of the NGO taught roughly 4,760 people how to give first aid. This year, the figure is at 5,300 after only six months.

Marius Benchea, manager of the Iași Voluntary Emergency Medical Services, says there are many myths about first aid regarding burn victims, for example. “The vast majority of tragedies start from cardio-respiratory arrests, when people are not resuscitated in time,” he thinks.

First-aid courses are now organized in Iași, Suceava, Bacău and Neamț. They last around three hours and cost RON 200 (EUR 40).

radu@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Wellphotos | Dreamstime.com)

Normal
 

facebooktwitterlinkedin

1

Romania Insider Free Newsletters