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Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania ranks as third most polluted EU country by PM2.5 concentrations

According to Eurostat, in four Member States of the European Union, the average annual concentration of fine particles (PM2.5) registers particularly high levels, namely in Bulgaria (19.6 μg / m3), Poland (19.3 μg / m3), Romania (16.4 μg / m3) and Croatia (16.0 μg / m3).

Estonia (4.8 μg / m3), Finland (5.1 μg / m3), and Sweden (5.8 μg / m3) have the lowest concentrations, according to Eurostat, News.ro reported.

Fine particles (PM10, up to ten micrometres in diameter) can penetrate deep into the lungs and inflame or aggravate heart and respiratory diseases. Even finer particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres (PM2.5) can cause even more severe health problems as they penetrate even deeper into the lungs.

This type of fine particulate pollution has been declining for several years, below the limit set in 2015 - of 25 μg / m3 on average annually - but there are still areas where this value is exceeded.

Despite this decrease, however, the level of air pollution in 2019 continues to exceed the level recommended by the World Health Organization, of 10 μg / m3 on average annually.

andrei@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Marian Mocanu/Dreamstime.com)

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Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania ranks as third most polluted EU country by PM2.5 concentrations

According to Eurostat, in four Member States of the European Union, the average annual concentration of fine particles (PM2.5) registers particularly high levels, namely in Bulgaria (19.6 μg / m3), Poland (19.3 μg / m3), Romania (16.4 μg / m3) and Croatia (16.0 μg / m3).

Estonia (4.8 μg / m3), Finland (5.1 μg / m3), and Sweden (5.8 μg / m3) have the lowest concentrations, according to Eurostat, News.ro reported.

Fine particles (PM10, up to ten micrometres in diameter) can penetrate deep into the lungs and inflame or aggravate heart and respiratory diseases. Even finer particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres (PM2.5) can cause even more severe health problems as they penetrate even deeper into the lungs.

This type of fine particulate pollution has been declining for several years, below the limit set in 2015 - of 25 μg / m3 on average annually - but there are still areas where this value is exceeded.

Despite this decrease, however, the level of air pollution in 2019 continues to exceed the level recommended by the World Health Organization, of 10 μg / m3 on average annually.

andrei@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Marian Mocanu/Dreamstime.com)

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