Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania’s LT interest rate moves upward against the trend in Europe

The yield of the Romanian long-term debt (10 yrs) traded on the secondary market increased again in August 2021, to a staggering 3.72%, according to data published by the European Central Bank quoted by CursDeGuvernare.ro.

It has risen to the highest level in the last 12 months, after falling in February 2021 to only 2.65%.

From just 3.24% in July, Romania’s long-term interest rate moved upward, against the trend seen in European markets.

There were only several countries where the interest rate rose, but only marginally - in the Czech Republic (from 1.72% to 1.74%) and Hungary (from 2.83% and 2.84%).

Poland managed a marginal reduction (from 1.61% to 1.60%). Outside the euro area, Croatia (0.43% from 0.45%) and Bulgaria (stationary at 0.14%) performed much better.

The EU27 average fell again in the negative area, from +0.02% in July to -0.08% in August. Basically, Romania borrows money at record interest rates.

Romania ranks first in the top of the most expensive loans that can be taken by a member state of the Union.

The spread versus the second-weakest peer, Hungary, has widened. After a declining trend in previous months, the spread widened versus the Czech Republic as well and rose to a level 2.3 times higher than Poland, an economy with a similar currency regime and the closest in structure to the Romanian one.

(Photo: Tibor Duris/ Dreamstime)

andrei@romania-insider.com

Normal
Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania’s LT interest rate moves upward against the trend in Europe

The yield of the Romanian long-term debt (10 yrs) traded on the secondary market increased again in August 2021, to a staggering 3.72%, according to data published by the European Central Bank quoted by CursDeGuvernare.ro.

It has risen to the highest level in the last 12 months, after falling in February 2021 to only 2.65%.

From just 3.24% in July, Romania’s long-term interest rate moved upward, against the trend seen in European markets.

There were only several countries where the interest rate rose, but only marginally - in the Czech Republic (from 1.72% to 1.74%) and Hungary (from 2.83% and 2.84%).

Poland managed a marginal reduction (from 1.61% to 1.60%). Outside the euro area, Croatia (0.43% from 0.45%) and Bulgaria (stationary at 0.14%) performed much better.

The EU27 average fell again in the negative area, from +0.02% in July to -0.08% in August. Basically, Romania borrows money at record interest rates.

Romania ranks first in the top of the most expensive loans that can be taken by a member state of the Union.

The spread versus the second-weakest peer, Hungary, has widened. After a declining trend in previous months, the spread widened versus the Czech Republic as well and rose to a level 2.3 times higher than Poland, an economy with a similar currency regime and the closest in structure to the Romanian one.

(Photo: Tibor Duris/ Dreamstime)

andrei@romania-insider.com

Normal
 

facebooktwitterlinkedin

1

Romania Insider Free Newsletters