Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Romania’s ruling party wants to ban words used for politicians with legal problems

Several MPs representing the ruling Social Democratic Party (PSD) want to change the Criminal Code so as to include a sanction for public statements that include the words criminals (“penali”) and imprisonable (“puscariabili”), reports local Adevarul.

Moreover, the MPs would also want some sort of compensations for those who are categorized this way, as they believe that the use of such words violates the presumption of innocence.

“Penali” is a word that has also been used by President Klaus Iohannis, and usually refers to people with criminal problems. “Puscariabili” refers to people that are liable to imprisonment.

PSD reacted after a statement made by President Iohannis last week. Before accepting the proposals for new ministers, the President said: “People with criminal problems don’t belong in state positions. Nothing against individuals, but in politics the benefit of the doubt doesn’t work as in court.”

PSD deputy Ioan Dirzu (opening picture) reacted to the President’s statement, saying that PSD should apply a European directive on the presumption of innocence.

“The statement of President Iohannis about criminals ("penali”) and the press releases from certain prosecution offices violate the European law. The terms “penali” and imprisonable (“puscariabili”) will have to disappear from the political discourse. The President’s statement on the issue of people with criminal problems is an anti-European discourse and directly attacks the fundamental human rights,” said Dirzu.

Serban Nicolae, the PSD senators’ group leader, has also shown an interest for this topic. He said that this subject would be discussed in the next meeting of the Special Committee on Justice Legislation. This committee is led by former justice minister Florin Iordache, who promoted the controversial Emergency Ordinance 13 (OUG 13), which would have brought serious changes to the Criminal Code. The ordinance was adopted by the Government in late-January and repealed a few days later after massive street protests.

Romanian Senate president worried about some ambassadors’ anticorruption “fetish”

Irina Marica, [email protected]

Normal
Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Romania’s ruling party wants to ban words used for politicians with legal problems

Several MPs representing the ruling Social Democratic Party (PSD) want to change the Criminal Code so as to include a sanction for public statements that include the words criminals (“penali”) and imprisonable (“puscariabili”), reports local Adevarul.

Moreover, the MPs would also want some sort of compensations for those who are categorized this way, as they believe that the use of such words violates the presumption of innocence.

“Penali” is a word that has also been used by President Klaus Iohannis, and usually refers to people with criminal problems. “Puscariabili” refers to people that are liable to imprisonment.

PSD reacted after a statement made by President Iohannis last week. Before accepting the proposals for new ministers, the President said: “People with criminal problems don’t belong in state positions. Nothing against individuals, but in politics the benefit of the doubt doesn’t work as in court.”

PSD deputy Ioan Dirzu (opening picture) reacted to the President’s statement, saying that PSD should apply a European directive on the presumption of innocence.

“The statement of President Iohannis about criminals ("penali”) and the press releases from certain prosecution offices violate the European law. The terms “penali” and imprisonable (“puscariabili”) will have to disappear from the political discourse. The President’s statement on the issue of people with criminal problems is an anti-European discourse and directly attacks the fundamental human rights,” said Dirzu.

Serban Nicolae, the PSD senators’ group leader, has also shown an interest for this topic. He said that this subject would be discussed in the next meeting of the Special Committee on Justice Legislation. This committee is led by former justice minister Florin Iordache, who promoted the controversial Emergency Ordinance 13 (OUG 13), which would have brought serious changes to the Criminal Code. The ordinance was adopted by the Government in late-January and repealed a few days later after massive street protests.

Romanian Senate president worried about some ambassadors’ anticorruption “fetish”

Irina Marica, [email protected]

Normal
 
1

Romania Insider Free Newsletter