Profile picture for user iuliane
Iulian Ernst
Senior Editor

Iulian studied physics at the University of Bucharest, and he sees himself as a physicist in the broadest sense of the word. He also studied economics at Charles University in Prague and Central European University in Budapest, after a master’s program in business administration at Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies. Since recently, he’s been exploring coding and data analysis for business and economics. As a freelancer, he worked for nearly two decades as an analyst for ISI Emerging Markets, Euromonitor International, Business New Europe, but also as a consultant for OMV Petrom and UkrAgroConsult. Iulian was part of the founding team of Ziarul Financiar. At Romania Insider, which he joined in 2018, he is reviewing the latest economic developments for the premium bulletins and newsletters. He would gladly discuss topics such as macroeconomics, emerging markets, Prague, energy sector including renewable, Led Zeppelin, financial services, as well as tech start-ups and innovative technologies. Email him at iulian@romania-insider.com. 

 

IMF ups GDP growth projection for Romania

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has improved its forecast for Romania's GDP growth from 4.4% last October to 6% under the latest World Economic Outlook (WEO) report issued on April 6.

The revised forecast is even more optimistic than the 4.3% economic advance assumed by the Romanian Government for the fiscal planning.

According to the IMF's projections, Romania's growth would be the second-fastest in the European Union after Spain's 6.4% projected advance.

The euro area economy is expected to grow by 4.4%, slower than the 5.2% advance expected in October, as expectations of a recovery in the region's main economies have moderated. The IMF revised down its growth forecasts for Germany (-0.6pp to 3.6%), Italy (-1pp, to 4.2%), Spain (-0.8pp), and France (-0.2 pp, to 5.8%).

As for the other macroeconomic indicators, the IMF expects Romania's current account (CA) deficit to slightly narrow to 5% of GDP this year (from 5.1% in 2020) and gradually narrow by 2026, but not under 4% of GDP.

On the upside, the IMF's deflationary expectations (to 2.1% in 2022 from 2.8% this year) imply assumptions for steady exchange rate dynamics over the next couple of years.

iulian@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Shutterstock)

Normal
Profile picture for user iuliane
Iulian Ernst
Senior Editor

Iulian studied physics at the University of Bucharest, and he sees himself as a physicist in the broadest sense of the word. He also studied economics at Charles University in Prague and Central European University in Budapest, after a master’s program in business administration at Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies. Since recently, he’s been exploring coding and data analysis for business and economics. As a freelancer, he worked for nearly two decades as an analyst for ISI Emerging Markets, Euromonitor International, Business New Europe, but also as a consultant for OMV Petrom and UkrAgroConsult. Iulian was part of the founding team of Ziarul Financiar. At Romania Insider, which he joined in 2018, he is reviewing the latest economic developments for the premium bulletins and newsletters. He would gladly discuss topics such as macroeconomics, emerging markets, Prague, energy sector including renewable, Led Zeppelin, financial services, as well as tech start-ups and innovative technologies. Email him at iulian@romania-insider.com. 

 

IMF ups GDP growth projection for Romania

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has improved its forecast for Romania's GDP growth from 4.4% last October to 6% under the latest World Economic Outlook (WEO) report issued on April 6.

The revised forecast is even more optimistic than the 4.3% economic advance assumed by the Romanian Government for the fiscal planning.

According to the IMF's projections, Romania's growth would be the second-fastest in the European Union after Spain's 6.4% projected advance.

The euro area economy is expected to grow by 4.4%, slower than the 5.2% advance expected in October, as expectations of a recovery in the region's main economies have moderated. The IMF revised down its growth forecasts for Germany (-0.6pp to 3.6%), Italy (-1pp, to 4.2%), Spain (-0.8pp), and France (-0.2 pp, to 5.8%).

As for the other macroeconomic indicators, the IMF expects Romania's current account (CA) deficit to slightly narrow to 5% of GDP this year (from 5.1% in 2020) and gradually narrow by 2026, but not under 4% of GDP.

On the upside, the IMF's deflationary expectations (to 2.1% in 2022 from 2.8% this year) imply assumptions for steady exchange rate dynamics over the next couple of years.

iulian@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Shutterstock)

Normal
 

Romania Insider Free Newsletters