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Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Romania’s Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa included in the Roman Emperors Route project

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, the former capital of Roman Dacia, was included in the Roman Emperors Route international project.

Representatives of the National Tourism Authority notified the Museum of Dacian and Roman Civilisation (MCDR) in Deva that one of the projects in which the institution is involved got official recognition from the Council of Europe, reports local Adevarul.

The Roman Emperors Route includes archeological sites from Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, and Croatia.

Together with the Danube Wine route, the Roman Emperors Route has been certified as a European cultural route by the Council of Europe.

“This project’s recognition will ensure a greater international visibility for the most important historical site under managed by MCRD Deva,” said Liliana Ţolaş, manager of the Museum of Dacian and Roman Civilisation.

Adamclisi, Histria, Apulum and Rosia Montana sites in Romania have also been selected to be part of the Roman Emperors Route, according to museum representatives.

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa was the capital and the largest city of Roman Dacia, in the 2nd and 3rd centuries.

Real-time images from Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa in Romania, available online 24/7.

Irina Popescu, [email protected]

(photo source: en.wikipedia.org)

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Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Romania’s Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa included in the Roman Emperors Route project

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, the former capital of Roman Dacia, was included in the Roman Emperors Route international project.

Representatives of the National Tourism Authority notified the Museum of Dacian and Roman Civilisation (MCDR) in Deva that one of the projects in which the institution is involved got official recognition from the Council of Europe, reports local Adevarul.

The Roman Emperors Route includes archeological sites from Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, and Croatia.

Together with the Danube Wine route, the Roman Emperors Route has been certified as a European cultural route by the Council of Europe.

“This project’s recognition will ensure a greater international visibility for the most important historical site under managed by MCRD Deva,” said Liliana Ţolaş, manager of the Museum of Dacian and Roman Civilisation.

Adamclisi, Histria, Apulum and Rosia Montana sites in Romania have also been selected to be part of the Roman Emperors Route, according to museum representatives.

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa was the capital and the largest city of Roman Dacia, in the 2nd and 3rd centuries.

Real-time images from Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa in Romania, available online 24/7.

Irina Popescu, [email protected]

(photo source: en.wikipedia.org)

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