Save the Children Romania opens counseling center for Ukrainian families in lași

Save the Children Romania has opened a counseling center for Ukrainian refugee families in lași, in northeastern Romania.

The non-profit plans to open similar centers in Bucharest, Galați, Suceava, and Baia Mare, areas where children and families find accommodation and decide to stay temporarily or for longer periods. These centers offer counseling, case management, activities for children and teenagers, goods and financial support.

At the same time, the NGO has set up areas for recreational and educational activities for 38 institutionalized children, integrated into the Romanian educational system. One area were set up at the Veronica Micle School in Iași. The children, who are hosted at the Bucium Social Services Center of DGASPC Iași, come from the Ukrainian child protection system. They now learn at the Veronica Micle School. Another area was set up inside the transit center for refugees eGros. 

Medical costs and medical services are a top need for Ukrainian refugee families, according to a Save the Children survey among 1,178 Ukrainian citizens. Medical costs and access to medical services – getting medicine, medical coverage for children, and support for registering with a family doctor were listed as a concern by 62% of respondents. Other needs were non-food items (55%), items such as clothing and footwear and other daily shopping items, the payment of the rent (46%) or of the utilities for the homes they reside in, and saving for unexpected situations (40%).

Since the start of the war in Ukraine, 1.5 million Ukrainian citizens have entered Romania, according to data quoted by Save the Children. By June 23, 83,780 Ukrainian citizens were still in the country. Of these, 4,360 requested asylum and 46,174 temporary work permits.

So far, the non-profit has offered humanitarian, legal, educational, and psychological assistance to 144,191 people – 82,112 Ukrainian children, and 62,079 adults, it said.

(Photo courtesy of Save the Children)

simona@romania-insider.com

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Save the Children Romania opens counseling center for Ukrainian families in lași

Save the Children Romania has opened a counseling center for Ukrainian refugee families in lași, in northeastern Romania.

The non-profit plans to open similar centers in Bucharest, Galați, Suceava, and Baia Mare, areas where children and families find accommodation and decide to stay temporarily or for longer periods. These centers offer counseling, case management, activities for children and teenagers, goods and financial support.

At the same time, the NGO has set up areas for recreational and educational activities for 38 institutionalized children, integrated into the Romanian educational system. One area were set up at the Veronica Micle School in Iași. The children, who are hosted at the Bucium Social Services Center of DGASPC Iași, come from the Ukrainian child protection system. They now learn at the Veronica Micle School. Another area was set up inside the transit center for refugees eGros. 

Medical costs and medical services are a top need for Ukrainian refugee families, according to a Save the Children survey among 1,178 Ukrainian citizens. Medical costs and access to medical services – getting medicine, medical coverage for children, and support for registering with a family doctor were listed as a concern by 62% of respondents. Other needs were non-food items (55%), items such as clothing and footwear and other daily shopping items, the payment of the rent (46%) or of the utilities for the homes they reside in, and saving for unexpected situations (40%).

Since the start of the war in Ukraine, 1.5 million Ukrainian citizens have entered Romania, according to data quoted by Save the Children. By June 23, 83,780 Ukrainian citizens were still in the country. Of these, 4,360 requested asylum and 46,174 temporary work permits.

So far, the non-profit has offered humanitarian, legal, educational, and psychological assistance to 144,191 people – 82,112 Ukrainian children, and 62,079 adults, it said.

(Photo courtesy of Save the Children)

simona@romania-insider.com

Tags
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