Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Romanian spring tradition included on UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list

The Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage has decided that the Romanian tradition of Martisor meets all the conditions to be included on the representative list of Intangible Cultural Heritage. Adrian Cioroianu, Romania’s permanent delegate to UNESCO, made the announcement on his Facebook page.

“Today, Martisorul has entered the UNESCO Intangible Heritage list! The file was submitted by Romania along with three other countries – Bulgaria, Macedonia, and the Republic of Moldova – where this beautiful spring tradition exists, with some differences in form but in the same spirit of celebrating the revival of nature,” Adrian Cioroianu wrote on Facebook.

The tradition of Martisor is one of the most important local spring traditions. Celebrated on March 1, Martisorul marks the changing of seasons. Men usually offer women martisoare (opening picture)small symbolic items tied with a red and white entwined cord - between March 1 and March 8, as a sign of respect and love. Some women choose to wear the martisor all March as it is believed that the one who wears the red and white string will be strong and healthy in the year to come. On the last day of March, they tie the red and white string to a branch of a fruit tree, as this is said to bring wealth.

The 12th session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage is currently taking place in the Republic of Korea.

Spring tradition in Romania: Martisor, the changing of seasons symbol

Irina Marica, [email protected]

Normal
Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Romanian spring tradition included on UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list

The Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage has decided that the Romanian tradition of Martisor meets all the conditions to be included on the representative list of Intangible Cultural Heritage. Adrian Cioroianu, Romania’s permanent delegate to UNESCO, made the announcement on his Facebook page.

“Today, Martisorul has entered the UNESCO Intangible Heritage list! The file was submitted by Romania along with three other countries – Bulgaria, Macedonia, and the Republic of Moldova – where this beautiful spring tradition exists, with some differences in form but in the same spirit of celebrating the revival of nature,” Adrian Cioroianu wrote on Facebook.

The tradition of Martisor is one of the most important local spring traditions. Celebrated on March 1, Martisorul marks the changing of seasons. Men usually offer women martisoare (opening picture)small symbolic items tied with a red and white entwined cord - between March 1 and March 8, as a sign of respect and love. Some women choose to wear the martisor all March as it is believed that the one who wears the red and white string will be strong and healthy in the year to come. On the last day of March, they tie the red and white string to a branch of a fruit tree, as this is said to bring wealth.

The 12th session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage is currently taking place in the Republic of Korea.

Spring tradition in Romania: Martisor, the changing of seasons symbol

Irina Marica, [email protected]

Normal
 

Romania Insider Free Newsletter