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Study reveals reasons why Romanian employees leave a company in the first 100 days

One in five Romanian employees decided to leave a job because of the atmosphere in the team or the bad management, but also because they lacked motivation, they didn’t know what to do or how to carry out their tasks, or because they didn’t have a prior training, according to a study by HPDI (Human Performance Development International).

The HPDI survey took three weeks and included employees from various industries such as banking, IT, pharmaceutical, medical, manufacturing, and FMCG. Most study participants were from the Human Resources departments of major players in the market.

“The Romanian market is currently facing a labor crisis and a problem of employee retention. We decided to make this study because we wanted to do a thorough analysis of why people are leaving a company quickly. From our experience, we noticed, among other things, that there is a discrepancy between what many managers think is the cause of the resignations and their real reasons,” HPDI managing partner Petru Păcuraru explained.

The findings of the study revealed that the lack of a mentoring program, the guidance needed to understand the tasks of a new job represents one of the employees’ major frustrations. Much of the people who resign in the first 100 days do so because of management shortcomings. According to research results, 19% of respondents left a company because they felt that a better opportunity arose. A similar percentage said they left because they did not know what and how to do, and only 14% looked for other jobs because they weren’t happy with the salary.

Reasons such as the lack of prospects for advancement or learning and a manager who is too authoritarian come at the bottom of the list, with only 7% of respondents pointing to these reasons for leaving the company in the first 100 days.

When it comes to solutions aimed at trying to stop people from leaving and increase retention, most surveyed managers (66%) believe that a well-established career plan is very important to persuade employees to remain in the company. Meanwhile, 59% of managers believe that one way to keep employees is to offer them work-based education programs in the form of different courses or trainings, while 47% mentioned coaching sessions as a method of increasing employee retention. A flexible program (45%) and higher wages (23%) are the other solutions mentioned by the managers.

[email protected]

(Photo source: Pexels.com)

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Newsroom
Study reveals reasons why Romanian employees leave a company in the first 100 days

One in five Romanian employees decided to leave a job because of the atmosphere in the team or the bad management, but also because they lacked motivation, they didn’t know what to do or how to carry out their tasks, or because they didn’t have a prior training, according to a study by HPDI (Human Performance Development International).

The HPDI survey took three weeks and included employees from various industries such as banking, IT, pharmaceutical, medical, manufacturing, and FMCG. Most study participants were from the Human Resources departments of major players in the market.

“The Romanian market is currently facing a labor crisis and a problem of employee retention. We decided to make this study because we wanted to do a thorough analysis of why people are leaving a company quickly. From our experience, we noticed, among other things, that there is a discrepancy between what many managers think is the cause of the resignations and their real reasons,” HPDI managing partner Petru Păcuraru explained.

The findings of the study revealed that the lack of a mentoring program, the guidance needed to understand the tasks of a new job represents one of the employees’ major frustrations. Much of the people who resign in the first 100 days do so because of management shortcomings. According to research results, 19% of respondents left a company because they felt that a better opportunity arose. A similar percentage said they left because they did not know what and how to do, and only 14% looked for other jobs because they weren’t happy with the salary.

Reasons such as the lack of prospects for advancement or learning and a manager who is too authoritarian come at the bottom of the list, with only 7% of respondents pointing to these reasons for leaving the company in the first 100 days.

When it comes to solutions aimed at trying to stop people from leaving and increase retention, most surveyed managers (66%) believe that a well-established career plan is very important to persuade employees to remain in the company. Meanwhile, 59% of managers believe that one way to keep employees is to offer them work-based education programs in the form of different courses or trainings, while 47% mentioned coaching sessions as a method of increasing employee retention. A flexible program (45%) and higher wages (23%) are the other solutions mentioned by the managers.

[email protected]

(Photo source: Pexels.com)

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