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Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania's Constitutional Court says progressive taxation of special pensions breaches Constitution

Romania's Constitutional Court (CCR) admitted on Tuesday, December 15, the objections expressed by the Ombudsman and the High Court (ICCJ) to taxing special pensions by up to 85%, Profit.ro reported.

A draft law provisioning the progressive taxation of the so-called "special pensions," namely those not backed by the recipients' past contributions, was passed by the lawmakers but referred to the Constitutional Court by the Ombudsman and ICCJ.

Therefore, the law was declared unconstitutional and will return to Parliament to be revised in line with the CCR's decision.

On June 17, the Chamber of Deputies passed the law on special pensions taxation by up to 85%, a decision supported by all major political parties. Thus, a tax rate of 10% will be applied to pensions between RON 2,000 (EUR 400) and RON 7,000 (EUR 1,400), and 85% to those that exceed RON 7,000.

In its complaint to CCR, the High Court argued that the bill violates several principles, including that of fair and equitable taxation and that of judges' independence. 

andrei@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Inquam Photos/Octav Ganea)

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Profile picture for user andreich
Andrei Chirileasa
Editor-in-Chief

Andrei studied finance at the Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies and started his journalism career in 2004 with Ziarul Financiar, the leading financial newspaper in Romania, where he worked for ten years, the last six of which as editor of the capital markets section. He joined the Romania-Insider.com team in 2014 as editor and became Editor-in-Chief in 2016. He currently oversees the daily content published on Romania-Insider.com and likes to stay up to date with everything relevant in business, politics, and life in Romania. Andrei lives with his family in the countryside in Northern Romania, where he built their own house. In his free time, he studies horticulture and tends to his family’s garden. He enjoys foraging in the woods and long walks on the hills and valleys around his village. Email him for story ideas and interviews at andrei@romania-insider.com. 

 

Romania's Constitutional Court says progressive taxation of special pensions breaches Constitution

Romania's Constitutional Court (CCR) admitted on Tuesday, December 15, the objections expressed by the Ombudsman and the High Court (ICCJ) to taxing special pensions by up to 85%, Profit.ro reported.

A draft law provisioning the progressive taxation of the so-called "special pensions," namely those not backed by the recipients' past contributions, was passed by the lawmakers but referred to the Constitutional Court by the Ombudsman and ICCJ.

Therefore, the law was declared unconstitutional and will return to Parliament to be revised in line with the CCR's decision.

On June 17, the Chamber of Deputies passed the law on special pensions taxation by up to 85%, a decision supported by all major political parties. Thus, a tax rate of 10% will be applied to pensions between RON 2,000 (EUR 400) and RON 7,000 (EUR 1,400), and 85% to those that exceed RON 7,000.

In its complaint to CCR, the High Court argued that the bill violates several principles, including that of fair and equitable taxation and that of judges' independence. 

andrei@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: Inquam Photos/Octav Ganea)

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