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Simona Fodor
Senior Editor

Simona joined the Romania Insider team in 2015, first working on our travel guide in English and, later, writing features and interviews for Romania-insider.com. She holds a BA in Romanian and English and an MA in American Studies from the University of Bucharest and started her journalism career in 2003.  Simona divides her time between her hometown Ploiești and Bucharest. While in Ploiești, she enjoys spending time with her family and taking long walks with the family dog. Going through an ever-expanding reading list and traveling, now replaced by travel literature and documentaries, are some of her favorite activities. You can get in touch with her for stories about arts, culture, and travel: [email protected] 

 

Survey shows how many Romanians throw away food

More than 80% of Romanians throw away food, and fruits, vegetables, and bread are the top items being wasted, according to a survey released by the Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Faculty (USAMV) in Cluj-Napoca.

USAMV Cluj-Napoca conducted the survey alongside the University of Craiova, the Technical University of Moldova, and the Sainte Cyrille et Method University in Skopje, alongside Food Waste Combat, an NGO working to raise awareness and reduce food waste. The survey was conducted online, among 2,754 participants, between June and September of this year, in Romania, the Republic of Moldova, and Macedonia. It was part of the “Zéro Gaspillage – pour une production et une consommation responsables en ECO” project, financed by the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie en Europe Centrale et Orientale. 

In Romania, 83% of the respondents said they throw away food; in Moldova, 78.7% said the same, while in Macedonia, the percentage was of 67.2%. 

The respondents to the survey also pointed to individual consumers and restaurants as the main actors responsible for food waste, while farmers and small retailers were considered the least responsible for this phenomenon.  

 “The subject of food waste generates a lot of interest for many respondents, and Romanian consumers are the ones that declare themselves interested in the topic in high numbers (some 60%). We can see a contradiction between ‘interest’ and ‘actual behavior,’ showing people’s insufficient education on sustainable consumption behavior. Fruits, vegetables, and bread are the items people waste most, and the reasons for this are the expiry date and the fact that they have gone bad,” professor Cristina Pocol, the coordinator of the USAMV Cluj-Napoca research team, explained.

The Covid-19 crisis impacted the households in the three countries equally. Still, some two thirds of the survey respondents said they could enjoy the same amount of food by spending the same amount of money, while the quantity of food thrown away increased in more than 10% of the households, contrary to initial hypotheses of the researchers. 

 

De Ziua Mondială a alimentației Universitatea noastră, în calitate de coordonator proiect, alături de Universitatea din...

Posted by USAMV Cluj-Napoca on Friday, October 16, 2020

“Food waste is not a phenomenon that can be attributed to a certain socio-demographic category but seems to be a widespread phenomenon; educational campaigns are still needed to diminish it,” Pocol said.

At the same time, three in four respondents to the questionnaire of healthy food delivery service LifeBox said they throw away the food they do not consume, Wall-street.ro reported. A quarter said they make sure to eat it or donate it. 

Both surveys were released on October 16, World Food Day and the National Day of Food and Combating Food Waste.

(Photo: Fascinadora/ Dreamstime)

[email protected]

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Profile picture for user sfodor
Simona Fodor
Senior Editor

Simona joined the Romania Insider team in 2015, first working on our travel guide in English and, later, writing features and interviews for Romania-insider.com. She holds a BA in Romanian and English and an MA in American Studies from the University of Bucharest and started her journalism career in 2003.  Simona divides her time between her hometown Ploiești and Bucharest. While in Ploiești, she enjoys spending time with her family and taking long walks with the family dog. Going through an ever-expanding reading list and traveling, now replaced by travel literature and documentaries, are some of her favorite activities. You can get in touch with her for stories about arts, culture, and travel: [email protected] 

 

Survey shows how many Romanians throw away food

More than 80% of Romanians throw away food, and fruits, vegetables, and bread are the top items being wasted, according to a survey released by the Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Faculty (USAMV) in Cluj-Napoca.

USAMV Cluj-Napoca conducted the survey alongside the University of Craiova, the Technical University of Moldova, and the Sainte Cyrille et Method University in Skopje, alongside Food Waste Combat, an NGO working to raise awareness and reduce food waste. The survey was conducted online, among 2,754 participants, between June and September of this year, in Romania, the Republic of Moldova, and Macedonia. It was part of the “Zéro Gaspillage – pour une production et une consommation responsables en ECO” project, financed by the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie en Europe Centrale et Orientale. 

In Romania, 83% of the respondents said they throw away food; in Moldova, 78.7% said the same, while in Macedonia, the percentage was of 67.2%. 

The respondents to the survey also pointed to individual consumers and restaurants as the main actors responsible for food waste, while farmers and small retailers were considered the least responsible for this phenomenon.  

 “The subject of food waste generates a lot of interest for many respondents, and Romanian consumers are the ones that declare themselves interested in the topic in high numbers (some 60%). We can see a contradiction between ‘interest’ and ‘actual behavior,’ showing people’s insufficient education on sustainable consumption behavior. Fruits, vegetables, and bread are the items people waste most, and the reasons for this are the expiry date and the fact that they have gone bad,” professor Cristina Pocol, the coordinator of the USAMV Cluj-Napoca research team, explained.

The Covid-19 crisis impacted the households in the three countries equally. Still, some two thirds of the survey respondents said they could enjoy the same amount of food by spending the same amount of money, while the quantity of food thrown away increased in more than 10% of the households, contrary to initial hypotheses of the researchers. 

 

De Ziua Mondială a alimentației Universitatea noastră, în calitate de coordonator proiect, alături de Universitatea din...

Posted by USAMV Cluj-Napoca on Friday, October 16, 2020

“Food waste is not a phenomenon that can be attributed to a certain socio-demographic category but seems to be a widespread phenomenon; educational campaigns are still needed to diminish it,” Pocol said.

At the same time, three in four respondents to the questionnaire of healthy food delivery service LifeBox said they throw away the food they do not consume, Wall-street.ro reported. A quarter said they make sure to eat it or donate it. 

Both surveys were released on October 16, World Food Day and the National Day of Food and Combating Food Waste.

(Photo: Fascinadora/ Dreamstime)

[email protected]

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