Romania Insider

My Romania Story - Daniel Berling (German): The nature is unbelievable. It's the greatest asset of this country

As part of our Romania Appreciation Weeks campaign, we're inviting our readers to share their stories and tell the world what they love about the country. Daniel Berling, a German married to a Romanian woman, joined our campaign and filled in this questionnaire. Below you can read more about how his Romania story started and what he loves about the country.

Daniel Berling's connection to Romania started as he was trying to rent his Berlin flat. He has since married a Romanian and has been living in Brașov since September. "Everything that happened to me in the last years has sooner or later something to do with Romania," he says. The local culture reminds him of the German one, and he lists the country's nature as one of its greatest assets. Deforestation should be stopped immediately, he says. He also enjoyed the interactions with the locals he has had so far, as people are curious about others, and he encourages Romanians to stay at home and work on their dreams, rather than going for a job abroad for which they are overqualified.

What is your name and how old are you?

My name is Daniel Berling. I am born on June 1982, which makes me 38 years old. I still can't believe that in one year and a half I shall turn 40. (*laughs)

What is your nationality and where do you live now?

My nationality is German, but I consider myself a European. Since the beginning of September 2020, I am registered in the beautiful city of Brașov.

What is your connection to Romania?

One day in Berlin I was at home waiting for people who were interested in renting my flat. I decided to study in another city but wanted to keep my flat. So I wanted to find an intermediate tenant. The third person who knocked at my door this day was a beautiful woman from Romania. There my Romanian connection began, and it still lasts.

Is Romania an important part of your life, and why?

My wife Andreea Georgiana, who is a positive psychotherapist (www.eumbra.ro), is Romanian, and with her, I found a family. Everything that happened to me in the last years has sooner or later something to do with Romania. Yes, Romania is important to my life. In my opinion, life consists of ups and downs, challenges, happiness and disappointments, stress and relief, excitement and boredom, peace and craziness. Somehow I find all of that in Romania.

What are the things you like about Romania and why?

I love the people because people here are curious about others, they approach strangers quickly, and quite frankly, I haven't experienced any racism at all. I like that very much.

The culture is awesome. It actually reminds me of the German culture a lot. Being a Romanian is not always easy, especially when you look at the wealth of Western Europe.

Romanians work hard: in Romania and abroad. It wouldn't hurt if other countries appreciate this effort more often.

The nature is unbelievable. It's the greatest asset of this country, and actually of the whole of Europe. Deforestation should be stopped immediately. I am sure that more than one alternative concept exists to compensate people who are currently dependent on it. With tourism, you can earn more money over a longer period of time than with these trees. Of course, this requires investments in the infrastructure.

The food is just home for me - especially ciorbă de burtă, how my father in law Vili is making it.

I really like about Romania the great opportunities that are waiting everywhere for the people to take them. Romania is on the rise. In comparison to other countries, a lot can be done here. Here there are many smart people with great ideas, and there is money from national and European funds. What is needed is a dedicated incubator and accelerator program to develop those ideas into scalable business models in such a way that the businesses remain in Romania. It's the politicians' task to further raise awareness about the high quality of work that comes from this country and that it is beneficial for the whole of Europe.

What don't you like about Romania and why?

I also see a lot of things that are bothering me, like littering of nature, the pollution by improperly fixed cars or antiquated production facilities, the outdated infrastructure of the public sector, and permanently negative people. Anyway, in the end, I try to focus on enjoying what I love and coming up with solutions for the things that bother me. That is exciting, and that is life for me: exciting!

If you had to advertise for Romania as a country, what would be the top things you would mention to promote it?

I am advertising Romania a lot because I believe in its potential. The question is, whom will I address?

On the one hand, I am trying to encourage young and smart people to really work on their ideas. The more they share their thoughts, the easier it is to receive help from like-minded people and professionals with expertise. The way from idea to the final project is long and hard but doable. Don't go abroad and work in a job for which you are overqualified. Stay here and work on your dream!

As a realist, I am also addressing Central European companies to consider expanding their business to Romania. Like this, the company enters an exciting market and increases its revenue. But also, the region where the company is expanding into will be a winner due to foreign investments and the creation of jobs and infrastructure. This process, however, needs to be made more simple and transparent. Nobody likes combinație anymore. These days are over.

What are your favorite places in Romania and why? 

I haven't seen much of Romania yet, unfortunately. I have a favorite spot, but I won't tell you, because otherwise I will be run over by people. A little hint, though: it's a beautiful spot in nature, where you have the most impressive view and the cleanest air. Actually, you can see a picture of it on my LinkedIn profile.

Anything else to share with us that was not covered in the questions above?

I could go on talking endlessly about my thoughts and ideas about Romania. However, if you are ever in Brasov, let's meet for a coffee and talk. I am always curious to hear other people's opinions as well.

(Photo courtesy of Daniel Berling)

[email protected]

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Romania Insider

My Romania Story - Daniel Berling (German): The nature is unbelievable. It's the greatest asset of this country

As part of our Romania Appreciation Weeks campaign, we're inviting our readers to share their stories and tell the world what they love about the country. Daniel Berling, a German married to a Romanian woman, joined our campaign and filled in this questionnaire. Below you can read more about how his Romania story started and what he loves about the country.

Daniel Berling's connection to Romania started as he was trying to rent his Berlin flat. He has since married a Romanian and has been living in Brașov since September. "Everything that happened to me in the last years has sooner or later something to do with Romania," he says. The local culture reminds him of the German one, and he lists the country's nature as one of its greatest assets. Deforestation should be stopped immediately, he says. He also enjoyed the interactions with the locals he has had so far, as people are curious about others, and he encourages Romanians to stay at home and work on their dreams, rather than going for a job abroad for which they are overqualified.

What is your name and how old are you?

My name is Daniel Berling. I am born on June 1982, which makes me 38 years old. I still can't believe that in one year and a half I shall turn 40. (*laughs)

What is your nationality and where do you live now?

My nationality is German, but I consider myself a European. Since the beginning of September 2020, I am registered in the beautiful city of Brașov.

What is your connection to Romania?

One day in Berlin I was at home waiting for people who were interested in renting my flat. I decided to study in another city but wanted to keep my flat. So I wanted to find an intermediate tenant. The third person who knocked at my door this day was a beautiful woman from Romania. There my Romanian connection began, and it still lasts.

Is Romania an important part of your life, and why?

My wife Andreea Georgiana, who is a positive psychotherapist (www.eumbra.ro), is Romanian, and with her, I found a family. Everything that happened to me in the last years has sooner or later something to do with Romania. Yes, Romania is important to my life. In my opinion, life consists of ups and downs, challenges, happiness and disappointments, stress and relief, excitement and boredom, peace and craziness. Somehow I find all of that in Romania.

What are the things you like about Romania and why?

I love the people because people here are curious about others, they approach strangers quickly, and quite frankly, I haven't experienced any racism at all. I like that very much.

The culture is awesome. It actually reminds me of the German culture a lot. Being a Romanian is not always easy, especially when you look at the wealth of Western Europe.

Romanians work hard: in Romania and abroad. It wouldn't hurt if other countries appreciate this effort more often.

The nature is unbelievable. It's the greatest asset of this country, and actually of the whole of Europe. Deforestation should be stopped immediately. I am sure that more than one alternative concept exists to compensate people who are currently dependent on it. With tourism, you can earn more money over a longer period of time than with these trees. Of course, this requires investments in the infrastructure.

The food is just home for me - especially ciorbă de burtă, how my father in law Vili is making it.

I really like about Romania the great opportunities that are waiting everywhere for the people to take them. Romania is on the rise. In comparison to other countries, a lot can be done here. Here there are many smart people with great ideas, and there is money from national and European funds. What is needed is a dedicated incubator and accelerator program to develop those ideas into scalable business models in such a way that the businesses remain in Romania. It's the politicians' task to further raise awareness about the high quality of work that comes from this country and that it is beneficial for the whole of Europe.

What don't you like about Romania and why?

I also see a lot of things that are bothering me, like littering of nature, the pollution by improperly fixed cars or antiquated production facilities, the outdated infrastructure of the public sector, and permanently negative people. Anyway, in the end, I try to focus on enjoying what I love and coming up with solutions for the things that bother me. That is exciting, and that is life for me: exciting!

If you had to advertise for Romania as a country, what would be the top things you would mention to promote it?

I am advertising Romania a lot because I believe in its potential. The question is, whom will I address?

On the one hand, I am trying to encourage young and smart people to really work on their ideas. The more they share their thoughts, the easier it is to receive help from like-minded people and professionals with expertise. The way from idea to the final project is long and hard but doable. Don't go abroad and work in a job for which you are overqualified. Stay here and work on your dream!

As a realist, I am also addressing Central European companies to consider expanding their business to Romania. Like this, the company enters an exciting market and increases its revenue. But also, the region where the company is expanding into will be a winner due to foreign investments and the creation of jobs and infrastructure. This process, however, needs to be made more simple and transparent. Nobody likes combinație anymore. These days are over.

What are your favorite places in Romania and why? 

I haven't seen much of Romania yet, unfortunately. I have a favorite spot, but I won't tell you, because otherwise I will be run over by people. A little hint, though: it's a beautiful spot in nature, where you have the most impressive view and the cleanest air. Actually, you can see a picture of it on my LinkedIn profile.

Anything else to share with us that was not covered in the questions above?

I could go on talking endlessly about my thoughts and ideas about Romania. However, if you are ever in Brasov, let's meet for a coffee and talk. I am always curious to hear other people's opinions as well.

(Photo courtesy of Daniel Berling)

[email protected]

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