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Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Number of Romanian and Bulgarian workers in Switzerland goes up ten times

The Romanians have been enjoying free access to the Swiss labor market since June 1, 2016, when Switzerland has eliminated all restrictions for Romanian and Bulgarian workers. This has led to a massive increase in the number of workers from the two East-European countries.

The number of Romanian and Bulgarian workers who have been admitted in Switzerland with permanent work permits increased by 996% in June 2016, when compared to the same month the previous year, reports local Mediafax.

However, by number of people, the increase is not that impressive. A total of 53 workers had work permits in Switzerland in June 2015, and the number increased to 581 in June this year.

Moreover, the share of Romanian and Bulgarian citizens in the total number of foreign residents in Switzerland is very low: 0.56% in 2014, or 17,134 people with permanent residence status. The figure is 12.5% higher than the one registered in 2013, of 15,226 people.

Switzerland could review the decision to liberalize the labor market for Romanians and Bulgarians on June 1, 2017.

Irina Popescu, [email protected]

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Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing [email protected]

 

Number of Romanian and Bulgarian workers in Switzerland goes up ten times

The Romanians have been enjoying free access to the Swiss labor market since June 1, 2016, when Switzerland has eliminated all restrictions for Romanian and Bulgarian workers. This has led to a massive increase in the number of workers from the two East-European countries.

The number of Romanian and Bulgarian workers who have been admitted in Switzerland with permanent work permits increased by 996% in June 2016, when compared to the same month the previous year, reports local Mediafax.

However, by number of people, the increase is not that impressive. A total of 53 workers had work permits in Switzerland in June 2015, and the number increased to 581 in June this year.

Moreover, the share of Romanian and Bulgarian citizens in the total number of foreign residents in Switzerland is very low: 0.56% in 2014, or 17,134 people with permanent residence status. The figure is 12.5% higher than the one registered in 2013, of 15,226 people.

Switzerland could review the decision to liberalize the labor market for Romanians and Bulgarians on June 1, 2017.

Irina Popescu, [email protected]

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