Romania Insider

New York Times travel article looks into Romania’s mineral water tradition

New York Times, one of the most prestigious newspapers in the world, has dedicated a feature article in its Travel section to Romania’s mineral springs.

“In the mountains of Transylvania, residents hoped visitors would flock to spas and resorts to bathe and heal in the cold, clear waters. The dream has faded, but the taps still flow,” author Palko Karasz, a Hungarian born in Romania’s region of Transylvania, starts his article.

The writer notes that people living in this region of Romania are still much fond of the mineral water springs, which they believe have healing powers. The article also analyzes how this region, that once dreamed to become the Switzerland of the east, has failed to capitalize on this valuable natural resource mainly because of bad policies during the Communist regime.

“Still, the springs have persevered because enterprising residents have fought for the survival of their water culture, teaming up to clean neglected fountains,” the article says.

Even if villagers in the region now have tap water at home, they still prefer the spring water for its properties and travelers who drive through the region stop on their way home to take a few bottles of water home.

Read the New York Times article here.

editor@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: ID 64742484 © Aurassh | Dreamstime.com)

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Romania Insider

New York Times travel article looks into Romania’s mineral water tradition

New York Times, one of the most prestigious newspapers in the world, has dedicated a feature article in its Travel section to Romania’s mineral springs.

“In the mountains of Transylvania, residents hoped visitors would flock to spas and resorts to bathe and heal in the cold, clear waters. The dream has faded, but the taps still flow,” author Palko Karasz, a Hungarian born in Romania’s region of Transylvania, starts his article.

The writer notes that people living in this region of Romania are still much fond of the mineral water springs, which they believe have healing powers. The article also analyzes how this region, that once dreamed to become the Switzerland of the east, has failed to capitalize on this valuable natural resource mainly because of bad policies during the Communist regime.

“Still, the springs have persevered because enterprising residents have fought for the survival of their water culture, teaming up to clean neglected fountains,” the article says.

Even if villagers in the region now have tap water at home, they still prefer the spring water for its properties and travelers who drive through the region stop on their way home to take a few bottles of water home.

Read the New York Times article here.

editor@romania-insider.com

(Photo source: ID 64742484 © Aurassh | Dreamstime.com)

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