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Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing irina.marica@romania-insider.com.

 

Dispute over alleged construction irregularities blocks Romania’s high-power laser project

The project of the high-power laser in Magurele, south of Bucharest, is currently blocked due to alleged irregularities found at the building set to host the Gamma ray system, an important component of the project.

EuroGammaS, the consortium that was supposed to install the Gamma system, which is an association of firms and scientific entities from Italy, France, Germany, Sweden, Denmark and the UK, refused to install the equipment because of several irregularities found at the building, local Recorder.ro reported. For example, their tests showed the floor is not uniform and the materials used are of doubtful quality. The foreign researchers said they could not install the equipment in any conditions and refused to go on with their work.

On the other hand, the Romanian side said the conditions meet the standards, adding that they have their own tests showing it. However, they haven’t presented documents in this sense so far.

One year ago, the Magurele Institute asked EuroGammaS to pay penalties for the delay. It then decided to cancel the contract and, at this point, EuroGammaS representatives decided to settle the dispute in court. The foreign researchers said the delays were caused by the deficiencies they allegedly found when they tested the infrastructure provided by the Romanian side.

The trial has recently begun at the Ilfov Tribunal in Buftea, close to Bucharest. According to Recorder.ro, the next hearing is scheduled for end-January.

Meanwhile, European Commission representatives have recently called the two sides to a meeting, hoping to solve this dispute. They also warned that Romania risks loosing some of the EU funds allocated to this project. This part of the project required an investment of EUR 67 million, out of a total of over EUR 300 million allocated, from EU funds, for the entire project in Magurele.

The Magurele laser project is one of the three pillars of the pan-European project ELI, which will become the world’s most advanced global structure destined to studies related to photon radiation with extreme characteristics. The other two centers, namely ELI-Beamlines and ELI-ALPS, will be built in the Czech Republic and Hungary.

Romania’s high-power laser successfully tested at 30% of its capacity

Irina Marica, irina.marica@romania-insider.com

(photo source: Eli-np.ro)

Normal
Profile picture for user irina.popescu0
Irina Marica
Senior Editor

Irina holds a BA in Journalism and has been part of the Romania-Insider.com team since its early days in 2011. She likes to keep the Romania-insider.com readers informed every day. Irina reports on various topics, on a wide range of areas such as politics, social or entertainment. She also writes travel or leisure articles, as well as interviews. She splits her time between Sinaia, her hometown, and Bucharest. Being born and raised in a mountain town, Irina loves spending time in nature, but she also likes to read, write, listen to music, travel, teach her dog new tricks and listen to other people’s stories (so don’t hesitate to contact her for an interview if you have an interesting story that you want to share with the Romania-insider.com readers). She dreams to visit Iceland one day and maybe get to see the Arctic Monkeys play live.  You can send her press releases or feedback on her stories by emailing irina.marica@romania-insider.com.

 

Dispute over alleged construction irregularities blocks Romania’s high-power laser project

The project of the high-power laser in Magurele, south of Bucharest, is currently blocked due to alleged irregularities found at the building set to host the Gamma ray system, an important component of the project.

EuroGammaS, the consortium that was supposed to install the Gamma system, which is an association of firms and scientific entities from Italy, France, Germany, Sweden, Denmark and the UK, refused to install the equipment because of several irregularities found at the building, local Recorder.ro reported. For example, their tests showed the floor is not uniform and the materials used are of doubtful quality. The foreign researchers said they could not install the equipment in any conditions and refused to go on with their work.

On the other hand, the Romanian side said the conditions meet the standards, adding that they have their own tests showing it. However, they haven’t presented documents in this sense so far.

One year ago, the Magurele Institute asked EuroGammaS to pay penalties for the delay. It then decided to cancel the contract and, at this point, EuroGammaS representatives decided to settle the dispute in court. The foreign researchers said the delays were caused by the deficiencies they allegedly found when they tested the infrastructure provided by the Romanian side.

The trial has recently begun at the Ilfov Tribunal in Buftea, close to Bucharest. According to Recorder.ro, the next hearing is scheduled for end-January.

Meanwhile, European Commission representatives have recently called the two sides to a meeting, hoping to solve this dispute. They also warned that Romania risks loosing some of the EU funds allocated to this project. This part of the project required an investment of EUR 67 million, out of a total of over EUR 300 million allocated, from EU funds, for the entire project in Magurele.

The Magurele laser project is one of the three pillars of the pan-European project ELI, which will become the world’s most advanced global structure destined to studies related to photon radiation with extreme characteristics. The other two centers, namely ELI-Beamlines and ELI-ALPS, will be built in the Czech Republic and Hungary.

Romania’s high-power laser successfully tested at 30% of its capacity

Irina Marica, irina.marica@romania-insider.com

(photo source: Eli-np.ro)

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